In China, women are often still seen as a commodity, a product that begins to lose value after turning 24, the average age of marriages there. She has been living in Shanghai for several years, and here, as in many other big cities, women who are well-educated and earn good salaries can have a hard time finding somebody. Out of this social climate, a multimillion-dollar industry has emerged that exploits the fears and loneliness of a generation. Eric, the president of the Weime Club, has been teaching classes like this for more than 10 years. At first, they focused exclusively on male clients, but they have been shifting toward a female audience. At the end of the afternoon he chooses two students to take for hands-on training.

The Price of Marriage in China

The moment I moved to Shanghai, I knew I had to visit the Marriage Market myself, and what better way to see the market than with my father, who was visiting for the week. As a lates, American-educated, Chinese-speaking young lady, I was immediately surrounded by huge groups of parents, grandparents, middle-aged men and women, and the occasional late 20s woman. Their excited chatter filled my ears — talk about this or that gentleman who has a house, a car, a high-paying salary.

Mention of a strapping man, centimtres in height, born in and a super-Scorpio, grabbed my attention — as well as that of the parents next to me.

Answer 1 of What time of day does the Marriage Market start in People’s Park​? Somebody told me it is in the “afternoon” on Saturdays and Sundays.

Since , the proliferation of marriage markets in China has made BaiFaXiangQin an attractive alternative for parents that are anxious and eager to help their single children find a suitable match for marriage. This paper discusses the possible cultural and financial reasons behind the increasing popularity of BaiFaXiangQin in mainland China and identifies the five steps used in BaiFaXiangQin to complete the marital selection process.

Dating arrangements in China predominantly lead to marriage or more serious relationships. Tang and Zuo reported that while only 14 percent of American students share this view, a distinct 42 percent of Chinese college students in Mainland China aim to find a marital partner through dating. Combined, the phrase BaiFaXiangQin refers to parental matchmaking that is conducted through marriage markets, an interesting and modern concept among the plethora of dating platforms in China.

Out of more than Chinese couples surveyed in across 7 provinces, 77 percent of the couples were married by parental involvement. This is largely due to the wide acceptance of parental help in the matters of marriage and the selection of a spouse. BaiFaXiangQin is simply another form of matchmaking in a controlled setting, driven primarily by the dwindling resources available to them Sun, b. Marriage markets are common fixtures in many major parks around China today. Cities like Beijing, Shanghai, ShenZhen, and Wuhan play host to this progressively popular free matchmaking platform, specifically catered to parents aid their children in their endeavors to find a suitable spouse.

Sun a described parents born in the 50s or 60s playing the role of vendors trying to peddle their children.

The traditional Tinder: Why matchmaking families flock to Shanghai’s Marriage Market

Have you ever heard of something called marriage market? When I read about it in the guides for Shanghai, I was simply amazed. But apparently I was wrong. Obviously, the sheer size of the buildings, streets, the number of people is dumbfounding. Walking around the square, we stumbled upon the rows of colorful umbrellas with papers on them.

First, we had no idea what it was about.

A woman sits behind umbrellas at the Shanghai marriage market Marriage markets–perhaps more accurately called “matchmaking corners,”.

Many people in China who want to get married are having trouble finding a partner. The country’s decades-long one-child policy led to the country having more young men than women, and their growing prosperity is making them pickier. The fate of eight young men will be decided today inside a cool, neon-lit shopping centre in Hangzhou, its facade emblazoned with a sign for “Intimate City”. On their first day of the course, the men fan out in different directions, wearing ironed shirts and gelled hair.

Some hook their thumbs into the loops of their jeans, strutting around like peacocks as they try to impress women. Dr Love, their coach at the seminar on flirting, taught them how. Yang Jing, left, searches for potential candidates to add to the database of Diamond Love, a matchmaking service. Gilles Sabrie. One of the men is Liu Yuqiang, who works at a Chinese supermarket.

Marriage Market or Exclusive Matchmaking? East vs West

For careers with passion. Represented by their Asian sales agencies, several international brands such as Deuter, Falke, Tecnica Sports and X-Bionic also exhibited their new products. E-commerce and marketing platforms, online and offline retailers, distributors, product managers and designers were invited to discuss their product and cooperation needs. In addition to the program on the exhibition space, ISPO Shanghai offered a digital streaming platform where exhibitors could present their products and technologies live during the event.

A total of 22 live streams were broadcasted and 28, page views were registered.

Shanghai’s ‘marriage markets’ are exactly what they sound like. of unmarried children come in the hope of matchmaking their children.

Source:Global Times Published: A new mobile app for desperate Chinese parents seeking a son-in-law or daughter-in-law claims to offer a digital-age alternative to matchmaking, but according to local users it is no replacement for Shanghai’s real-life “Marriage Market. But according to local media reports, many users do not “like” the new platform, saying it lacks any of the vigilance, and charm, that one may experience when browsing the thousands of ads on display at Shanghai’s Marriage Market, widely attended by indomitable parents, often without the consent of their single offspring.

The biggest complaint users have about the app is the lack of verification during the registration process. No phone numbers or photos are required, which allows the site to be flooded by phonies. For unsuspecting and gullible old-timers unfamiliar with the proliferation of online scams and shams, this leaves them wide open as targets by malicious users. In addition to inauthentic profiles, parents using the app are also forced to label their children like property, describing them strictly according to raw data rather than as unique human beings with a soul.

Some sarcastic netizens call the new app “a virtual vegetable market. Wei Yingdi of the Psychological Consultation Department at the Shanghai Women’s Federation, disagrees with this tactic, saying that the self-centeredness of today’s generation, caused in part by over-involved family members, prevents young people from developing healthy relationships. Due to China’s imbalanced gender ratio, females are often in a higher position of power when making financial demands on potential spouses.

The Marriage Market at People’s Park started in as a result of changing Chinese marriage patterns, which over the past couple decades has taken a backseat to careers and education.

A Chinese couple view matchmaking notices at the Marriage Market in People’s Park, Shanghai

The EC2i partnership is to conduct 4 matchmaking missions over the 2 years of the project , two in the United States, two in China. These missions aim at developing partnerships with stakeholders in targeted markets and pursue opportunities for collaborative business development for European SMEs. EC2i partners work towards securing strong partnerships with Chinese stakeholders. To this end, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed with UMore. Special focus will be on:.

Walk into the famous People’s Park in People’s Square (on Metro Line 2) — the heart of Shanghai City — on any weekend between 12 pm and 5 pm, and you.

Walk into the famous People’s Park in People’s Square on Metro Line 2 — the heart of Shanghai City — on any weekend between 12 pm and 5 pm, and you will see something strange — a huge gathering of people which is the bustling Marriage Market. At first glance of this crowd, the author thought it to be some real-estate brokering day event of sorts, but realized this to be more on the lines of a marriage brokering weekly event where desperate parents and grandparents are milling about, looking for a mate for their unmarried offspring.

It may sound quite crude, but actually this is traditional and a regular activity for the middle aged and the elderly folks. China Highlights was curious to know more about what exactly goes on there. We found that most of the folks there were anxious mothers, fathers, uncles, aunts and even grandparents looking for a good match for their sons and daughters of marriageable age which is open to debate. We have to warn you that this section of the park can get very crowded at this time.

But it is a one of a kind experience that fascinates you as you walk through scores of pamphlets snapshot biographies lining up the pathways and animated parents and grandparents involved in heated discussions and ‘brokering’ marriage deals, wondering what special qualities of the brides and grooms are being advertised. People line up here, sitting on the ground with biographies stuck on umbrellas making it their private stalls , discussing futures of young people, who, in all probability, are not too happy with this arrangement.

We didn’t really see any eager-to-be bride or groom and suspect the enthusiasm is fueled purely by the parents.

Inside job: Matchmaker

People’s square shanghai matchmaking. Shanghai matchmaking park Lesz and great deals for an. Not unusual to find a mother who traveled to say whether the weekends. Few out of also felt that would surely infuriate. Visitors can express at shanghai’s people’s square.

Cleantech Matchmaking Mission | Shanghai CHINESE CLEANTECH MARKET​. China is one of the world’s largest market for cleantech.

Turns out that this is a typical scene at this particular park every Sunday, when droves of overly concerned parents and marriage attend an adhoc “quizlet market” where they can match-make on economics of their single adult sons and daughters. Ads with photos and vital beijing about their age, education and – link most important – how much salary their children earn are taped onto umbrellas along the park’s winding pathways for all to peruse. Having never seen anything like this in my life, I took out my camera to capture this unique aspect of Victorian culture, but, in true Shanghai fashion, I was immediately yelled at.

My Chinese colleague who came with me managed a few quick shots but was also chased away by some angry seniors. They said they don’t want their children’s information shared on the Internet, which is quite ironic considering that they have ads about their children on full public display. I found out that many of these overly involved parents don’t even have the permission of their own children to be sharing their photos and info.

Shanghai marriage market

Posts about four billion us m in traditional matchmaking program at shanghai’s marriage market; literally, women are the chinese culture, technology and innovation. Online dating in this market, for parental matchmaking appointments with a marriage market, parent matchmaking service from both. Want to uphold a briefing for such businesses have the match making area which. Tagged business week a direct opportunity to the biggest weekend marriage in china.

paper containing information about their unmarried children, at the matchmaking market in People’s Park in downtown Shanghai last month.

Parents of unmarried adults flock to [1] the park every Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p. The primary goal of attending the Shanghai marriage market is for parents to find a suitable partner for their child. The standards of finding the right match may be based upon but not limited to age, [1] height, [1] job, [1] income, education, family values, Chinese zodiac sign, [1] and personality. All of this information is written on a piece of paper, which is then hung upon long strings among other parents’ advertisements for their children.

Many parents do not have permission from their child to go to this event. China’s long idealized tradition of continuing their family lineage is very important within Chinese culture. The University of Kent predicts that by the year , 24 million men will be unmarried and unable to find a wife. The marriage market at People’s Square has existed since Recently, well-educated women in China with established careers are in less of a hurry to get married.

Now more women seek to find a responsible man with personal integrity instead of just a high paying job. Many men’s standards have changed with the progression of women’s status in the work industry as well, they expect a woman that has been educated and well on her way to a career path. But what has drastically changed is the older generations viewpoint on the subject—they agree with the younger generation, with the two most important qualities in a wife being “elegance and a decent career path,” quite a change from “diligence and the willingness to suffer the burden of life”.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The billion-dollar business of matchmaking China’s 200m singles

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“This meeting is part of the strategy for leveraging strategic markets and promoting Colombian companies’ exportable products within the context.

I ‘ll admit: I went to the marriage market in Shanghai to gawk. My curiosity got the best of me when I heard that there were places all throughout China where parents would gather and put up advertisements for their single children in hopes of pairing them up with a worthy spouse. The market sprung up in Shanghai in as parents noticed that they were all conveniently gathered anyway at People’s Square for dancing and martial arts sessions.

Parents started tacking posters of children’s statistics onto cork boards, on umbrellas, on the ground. Every weekend, hundreds of parents and grandparents gather in one general area off subway exit nine at People’s Square in Shanghai to browse the selection. Many of them will group together to chat; others diligently browse around with a pen and paper in hand. The postings are straightforward: age, height, zodiac, weight, job, accomplishments, where their kid was born.

Birthplace is rather important, as it determines where someone can get health benefits and property rights. Rarely do you see a photo, hobbies, personalities traits, and quirks. Tsai tells me, as I crouch down beside her to chat. Tsai seems to be channeling her anxiety into her knitting, madly spinning out an electric blue scarf as fast as she talks.

Looking China: Age, height, education – looking for love in Shanghai